Nashville / Community History

Raymond Whittaker and wife, Jane Whittaker, pose together. Unknown date.

Write, Wire or Call Me Real Soon

In honor of African American History Month (and also the month of love), I'm honoring a local Nashville citizen and veteran, Raymond Whittaker, from the small collection of his correspondence, ephemera, and photos we have here in Archives. 

U.S. Department of Agriculture Weather Bureau, Daily Local Record of Weather Readings for January 24th, 1925

When Deer are in Gray Coat in October, Expect a Severe Winter

Who loves talking about the weather?! Me, that's who! Did you know the early beginnings of the National Weather Service was actually under the U.S. Army in what was called the Signal Service? Actually it's not that surprising, but what might be is that here in Metro Archives, we have several of their original journals from the Nashville station. Read on if you're intrigued...

 

Black and white close-up view of the Du Pont Rayon Plant in Old Hickory, sometime after 1924 when it was built.

The Powder City of the World

Most people recognize Nashville as the "Music City" capital of the world, but can you say that you've ever heard its other nickname - "the Powder City of the World"? If you're familiar with the history of the Old Hickory community and the company of DuPont, you probably have. If not, read on. 

President Kennedy and his wife visited Nashville in May, 1963.

"Happy Birthday, Mr. President!"

Though November marks the last month of his life, May of this year would have marked JFK's 100th birthday; May 29th to be exact. In honor of this milestone, here's a look back at a few of President Kennedy's visits to Nashville, as well as a few anecdotes from people that remember the day he died.

Senior photo of Paula Herring in the 1963 John Overton High School yearbook.

Nashville's Urban Legend

If the name "Paula Herring" sounds familiar to you, then you already know where this blog post is going. But if not, keep reading. I'm about to tell the gruesome tale of young Paula's murder back in 1964, from the info provided by Michael Bishop in his new book, A Murder in Music City: Corruption, Scandal, and the Framing of an Innocent Man.   

A photo of children after Meigs School was integrated in 1957

Nashville's History with School Integration

Going on 60 years ago, Nashville followed suit with the landmark 1954 case Brown v. Board of Education, and began a "stair-step" plan to integrate public schools. But it wasn't without difficulty or a strong pushback.

News clipping from 1932 Total Eclipse in Nashville - View of the eclipse at 93% totality

Nothing Short of a Joy of a Lifetime

As the country collectively experienced the first total eclipse in many, many years on Mondayhere's a look back at previous eclipses that Nashville has experienced.

Old Nashville Police Station near Public Square

"Murder & Mayhem in Nashville" - Nashville's Chaotic Past

Nashville is a city with an easily forgettable past, or rather people would prefer to forget its past. But that doesn't change the fact that it has a rather macabre and peculiar one. In Brian Allison's recently published book "Murder & Mayhem in Nashville," he highlights some of the more gruesome tales from Nashville's past.

Buffalo grazing at the Nashville Zoo

Lions and Tigers and Bears...Oh Nashville!

Prior to the opening of the Nashville Zoo in Cheatham County, in 1991, the city came close to purchasing animals for a zoo around the time the Metro Government formed (1963). I recently stumbled upon this intriguing story and thought it was too good not to share. 

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