Ominous October Reads

Tis the season for all things spooky! Here are a few reads I'm hoping to get to this Halloween season.

Cats and bats and creatures, oh my! The time has come to break out the cauldron and carve up a pumpkin. Halloween will soon be upon us. If you're like me and you're wanting to get into the spooky season, here are a few creepy reads I plan on completing.

The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein

I meant to read this last year, but by the time I got to it, it was well into December and it didn't feel right to read it then. This book tells the events of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein through the eyes of Elizabeth Lavenza, who is taken in by the Frankenstein family and watches as the horror unfolds. It promises to be very creepy and incredibly dark. I'll be reading this one in a well-lit room.

The Hazel Wood

I missed this one when it came out, but I've heard nothing but stellar reviews. When her grandmother dies and her mother is taken, Alice must venture to the Hazel Wood, a place she has been told to avoid. This book seems to focus on dark fairy tales rather than monsters, and that has me excited. Plus the sequel is slotted to come out early next year, and I love a good series.

The Graveyard Book

Neil Gaiman is having a moment. The Good Omens series was a massive hit, Sandman is apparently getting turned into a Netflix original, and new fans are suddenly discovering the world of Neil. The Graveyard Book follows the story of a boy raised by the ghosts and ghouls who inhabit a graveyard. This comes as a two-part graphic novel arc as well, and I'm sure that both versions are stunning and spooky. 

Say Nothing: A Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland

I do not read true crime novels because if I get nightmares from reading about made-up stories and monsters, just imagine how wrecked I will be after reading something and realizing "yes, that actually happened and could happen again." However, I will make an exception for this book as it is just as much a history book as it is a true crime novel. It follows the abduction and murder of Jean McConville, a Belfast mother of 10, and from there it goes on to talk about the Troubles in Northern Ireland. I love Irish history, and I am certain that this will be a heart-breaking and fascinating read. 

His Hideous Heart

I believe that when Dahlia Adler sat down to create this book, she thought, "Now what would Emily like?" This is a collection of short stories that are modern retellings of classic Edgar Allan Poe writings. I'm speechless at how amazing the premise is, and quite frankly, I can't wait to dig into this.

Happy Haunting, ghosts and ghouls!

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