Horror and Thriller

Fellside book cover

Addiction, Fire, and Prison Life - A Book Review of Fellside by M.R. Carey

Having read The Girl with All the Gifts, I was really excited to pick up the second book under Mike Carey’s new pen name. Mike Carey is very well-known in the comic book scene as the writer for the Vertigo comic book series Lucifer and 35 issues of Hellblazer (which was the basis for both the movie and television show Constantine).  He is the current ongoing writer for X-Men: Legacy and the Ultimate Fantastic Four for Marvel Comics.  These are just a few of his credentials in the world of comic books – he’s written fiction novels, as well.

Misery book cover

Who is Paul Sheldon? Misery by Stephen King

First, I should say that I know this book isn’t new. It came out in 1987 when I was a delicate three-year-old child, who had not quite gotten to chapter books just yet. Misery is a psychological thriller about an author of famous Victorian-era romances who is rescued from a car crash by his number one fan, Annie Wilkes. The only problem? Annie Wilkes is completely off her rocker.

The Day of the Triffids book cover

The Day of the Triffids

You might not expect a novel about killer plants to be thoroughly lacking in over-the-top corniness, but John Wyndham's The Day of the Triffids handily pulls it off.

Scowler Book Cover

Book Review: Scowler

I came across Scowler while at the library. I did not check it out at that point, because while it piqued my interest, I am always somewhat hesitant to pick up teen novels. Many teen novels that I have read have diverse plots, and are well written. However, I would quickly discover that a major part of the books’ focus are on the main characters’ love lives— a love triangle usually ensues. I like romance in small doses. When I realized this book was a Horror/Suspense novel, I quickly ran to check it out from the library.

Never Look a Gift Horse in the Mouth: The Girl With All the Gifts

Introducing Melanie, the smartest of a group of children being taught in an underground facility. They have a variety of teachers, some cold and calculating, others loving and caring like Mrs. Justineau. Mostly, they learn about literature and Greek myths. They are no tests. In fact, the children are all strapped into chairs, escorted by armed soldiers, and treated like animals.

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