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Read Aloud Books

October is pumpkin time!  This ancient food source of indigenous peoples all across the Americas continues to be an important part of our lives and is celebrated both nutritionally and aesthetically.

The halcyon days of late summer, 1963, brought about one of the most significant actions of the era.  It brought attention to the problems of inequality and the demands of a people who were willing to stand together and say, "no more."  Congress heard and acted. 

As children begin to understand that they are growing and will one day grow up they think about what they want to become--what kind of work they want to do.  Books help them learn about the possibilities.

whoever you are

Looking for new favorites that support early reading skills like rhyme, repetition, colors, and numbers? Here is a list of books with diverse representation and inclusive themes for a young audience. 

The Memory Box: a Book About Grief by Joanna Rowland, is based upon the author's experience of creating a memory box so she might never forget a dear friend who died.  The closing pages of the book lists several ways to support a child who is experiencing grief and makes suggestions for the creation of a memory box.

Just as it takes many varied pieces of cloth to make a beautiful whole quilt, it takes a diverse group of people to make a beautiful community of many faces.  Nashville Public Library has a number of resources celebrating diversity.

Do you ever feel like you're going to be sick if you have to read one more overly sweet children's book to your kids this holiday season? Well these books about dinosaurs, pirates, and bug-eyed pugs are the perfect remedy for you! 

Although she is perhaps best known as the writer of The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood has also written several books for children. Take an opportunity to introduce your child to one of the giants of modern literature by reading some books written especially for them.

It’s no secret that libraries love reading! But last year, when Nashville Public Library launched Read to Rise, we wanted the entire city of Nashville to know how critical reading to children from birth is to a child’s success in school. Over the past year, we’ve spread the word to nearly 1,000 children who’ve registered for Read to Rise.  All told, those kids, parents, and caregivers have read together for more than 12,000 days! 

 

The news of Toni Morrison's passing on August 5 was met with tributes and gratitude for a life well lived. While she is best known as the author of such novels as The Bluest Eye and Beloved, Morrison also wrote several books for children. It is not yet too early to introduce the children in your life to the work of this incomparable writer.

Do you have a picky young eater at home? You are not alone! Bread and Jam for Frances is the story of a winsome little badger who decides that only bread and jam will satisfy her appetite.

Writer Pat Mora is a poet, an educator, an activist, and a storyteller who often borrows from her Chicana background to tell stories of family, heritage, and the joy that reading can bring.

Whether you have room for a acre mini-farm or a single pot in a sunny window, your child can benefit from growing things! 

Born in rural Kenya and educated in the United States, Wangari Maathai was the first woman in East Africa to earn a doctoral degree, a Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, and is the founder of the Green Belt Movement. Her incredible story is the subject of several picture book biographies for children.

The 28 days of February will never be enough to highlight the full depth and breadth of black history in the United States and around the world. Picture books are an ideal (and beautiful) way, however, to address the gaps in our knowledge of the contributions of African Americans to History writ large.

Have you ever read a book that you just want to hug when you finish? And maybe not let anyone else touch it until you’re ready to let it go? Maybe that's just a children's librarian thing? Anyway, I had that experience with Sealed with a Kiss by Beth Ferry.

The announcement of the Caldecott, Newbery, and other recipients of the American Library Association (ALA) Youth Media Awards is a cause for celebration! Did your favorites win? Or what books will now be on your reading list? Check out our round-up (with links to our collection) below

Born in Mexico City, author and illustrator Angela Dominguez grew up in Texas. Named several times as a Pura Belpré Honor for illustration, she now lives on the East Coast. Her friendly and open artwork invites the reader into a world where they can truly see themselves and others.

 

 

One of the most marvelous writers and illustrators of children's literature today, Yuyi Morales mines her Mexican childhood for the magical words and riotous colors that inform her beautiful books. She has won numerous awards for her work, including the prestigious Pura Belpré Medal.

Expanding your family is a crazy yet wonderful time. Luckily, there are picture books for almost every situation that can help ease the transition for your little ones.

Summer is a great time for getting outside and exploring all the tiny creatures that surround us. Check out these activities and books to help you and your kids learn more about all the creepy crawlies hiding in plain sight!

Published on March 13, Junot Díaz´s long awaited first book for children is a love letter to the children-both young and old- who carry in themselves the memories of the places that have shaped them and their communities.

Active kids love to run and explore the world around them. But how can you read a story when your kid is always on the move? 

It's especially important  in our current cultural climate that children not only see themselves in the books they read, but also that they read about children different from them. Below are some examples of books in NPL's collection in which biracial and multiracial children take center stage.

Now that it's officially December, we can bring out the Christmas music! These beautifully illustrated versions of Christmas songs and carols bring traditional music to life in a whole new way.

Reading aloud to your young child is a great way to promote early literacy skills. But, did you know that it’s also an amazing opportunity to expose your little one to numbers and counting? In this article, we’ll talk about how children developmentally prepare to become mathematicians, and how you as a parent and/or caregiver can help facilitate their learning. One, two, three, let’s begin!

Research shows that up to 80% of a child's brain development takes place before age three, making the earliest years the most essential in regards to creating a lifelong reader and learner. Here are some facts about your baby's brain development and some suggested shared reading. 

Reading stories before bed is a great way to engage with your child and ensure their lifelong love of books and stories. It is also a key opportunity to bond with your child and show them how much you enjoy reading and books too.

We all know that reading to your child is an important part of their development. But did you know it can also be hilarious? There are lots of children's books out there that will have you and your child both laughing out loud!

We get a lot of requests for chapter books appropriate for very young kids. I love this request! It’s such a cozy image to think of a family huddled together at bedtime, reading a chapter or two each night. But it’s a little stressful for library staff. Forgetting one small kidnapping or accidental death in a gentle read, and this cozy image takes a traumatic turn.